Roasted Carrot Hummus

If hummus is offered on a menu I tend to order it.  It has become one of my top ten favorite foods to eat.  I love the creamy and simple, yet complex savory flavor it hummus has.  Hummus is a regular staple item in our refrigerator and even my 7 year old son loves to have it as an afternoon snack.

Unfortunately due to some recent issues I have had to cut back on my intake of legume containing food items.  This has been really hard since I love beans and have been known just to eat black beans straight out of the can.  I have also had to cut back on the amount of oil in my diet (even good oil).  Seeing that traditional hummus is largely made up of chickpeas (part of the legume family) and olive oil I was desperate to find a hummus alternative that I could enjoy.

Recently I was at the grocery store, pining over the prepared hummus containers, when much to my surprise I saw three new hummus varieties!  The new varieties were black bean, beet and carrot hummus.  I could not believe it! I was immediately intrigued. Could this be the answer for me?  Could I now enjoy my beloved hummus once again?  I quickly turned over the packages to read the ingredients and just like that my excitement turned to sadness.  All three hummus varieties has a base of legume (black bean or chick pea) and copious amounts of oil.

After walking away from the hummus with my head hung low, it dawned on me.  Why couldn’t I made hummus of my own that did not contain legumes and large amounts of oil?  I know that traditional hummus is chickpeas but maybe the hummus flavor profile could come from the spices instead.  Seeing that one of the hummus varieties was carrots I decided that I would try making a hummus that was strictly made using carrots as the base.

I spend a good amount of time researching hummus.  How it is made, what the main spices are and what other ingredients make hummus…well hummus.   I learned the two main spices are cumin and garlic.  But the star of the hummus recipe is Tahini.  Tahini is basically ground sesame seeds.  You can purchase different varieties of prepared Tahini in the grocery store.  Most varieties are just straight up sesame seeds, but some do use extra ingredients like fillers and added oils so be sure to check the label.  You can also make Tahini at home by roasting sesame seeds and then grinding them to a paste in your food processor.

For my hummus I needed to decide how the carrots would be cooked.  I went through a list of options from steaming them to boiling them.  I knew I wanted the carrots to have a complex, rich flavor. Baba ghanoush, which is another one of my favorite dips, is made from roasted eggplant.  I figured since the eggplant was roasted in that recipe, I would try roasting the carrots for my recipe.  I figured roasting the carrots would give the hummus the flavor profile I was looking for.

Olive or sesame oil is traditionally used to give hummus its signature silky, creamy texture.  I knew it was going to be hard for me to find an oil replacement.  My system can handle small amount of coconut oil, but coconut oil would not work for this recipe since it tends to harden once it is cooled.   After many trials with oil substitutes I figured I would try my luck with just using water.  I figured the Tahini already had a good amount of oil in it from the sesame seeds that maybe the base recipe could stand on it own without adding extra oil.

 In this post I have included two versions of roasted carrot hummus.  The first version uses oil and the second version does not use oil.  If your system and diet allow for oil then the first recipe can be used.  If your system and diet is similar to mine then the second recipe can be used instead.  I will note that oil does bring a certain flavor and texture to the hummus so the first recipe is without a doubt tastier then the second recipe.   Both recipes make a small amount of hummus and can be doubled if you should need more.  Lemon juice can also be added to either recipe.  I am not a huge fan of lemon and so I have omitted it for my own personal taste.

Roasted Carrot Hummus (Version 1 with Oil)

1/2 pound of peeled carrots (about 4 medium sized sticks)

1 teaspoon Cumin

1/4 cup Tahini 

1/2 teaspoon salt

3 tablespoons of oil or sesame oil 

2 garlic cloves (or 1/2 teaspoon of powdered garlic)

1 tablespoon lemon juice (optional) 

Preheat oven to 425 degrees.  Cut the carrots into bite sized slices.  Lightly coat the carrots in oil and 1/2 teaspoon of cumin.   Roast carrots for about 15 to 20 minutes (checking regularly to see if they are slightly browned and tender).  Combine the warm carrots, rest of the cumin (1/2 teaspoon), Tahini, salt, oil, garlic and lemon juice (optional) in a food processor/blender.  Blend on medium to high for a couple minutes.  You will most likely have to stop and stir the mixture a couple times to ensure it is all blended properly.  You can add more oil along the way to achieve the constantly you desire.  Cool and store in and airtight container in the refrigerator.

 

Roasted Carrot Hummus (Version 2 without Oil)

1/2 pound of peeled carrots (about 4 medium sized sticks)

1 teaspoon Cumin

1/4 cup Tahini 

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/4 cup water

2 garlic cloves (or 1/2 teaspoon of powdered garlic)

1 tablespoon lemon juice (optional) 

Preheat oven to 425 degrees.  Cut the carrots into bite sized slices.  Lightly coat the carrots in oil (or you can omit oil all together) and 1/2 teaspoon of cumin.   Roast carrots for about 15 to 20 minutes (checking regularly to see if they are slightly browned and tender).  Combine the warm carrots, rest of the cumin (1/2 teaspoon), Tahini, salt, water, garlic and lemon juice (optional) in a food processor/blender.  Blend on medium to high for a couple minutes.  You will most likely have to stop and stir the mixture a couple times to ensure it is all blended properly.  You can add more water along the way to achieve the constantly you desire.  Cool and store in and airtight container in the refrigerator.

 

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Roasted Carrot Hummus

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s